The ten golden rules of Omaha 8 – Part 7

By | February 27, 2014

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7: Aces are easily overrated

In Hold’em you can expect to be dealt aces once every 221 hands [odds of 220 to 1]. In Omaha you will be dealt aces more than one time in every 60. Omaha 8 aces can vary greatly in quality. At the top end, A-A-2-3 double suited gives you terrific high and low potential. At the other end of the spectrum, a hand such as A-A-8-J unsuited gives you little to play for. When first in, in early position, it should probably be discarded. Furthermore, on the flop, in a multi way pot, aces will need to improve to stand much if any chance of winning the high. Don’t bet or raise your aces in a multi-way pot needlessly or worse become wedded to them!

Another key difference to Hold’em is that in Omaha 8 Limit, you should be prepared to quickly discard great pre flop hands which don’t hit the flop. For example, the lovely A-2-3-x hand is probably worthless on a flop with two high cards. Equally the high suited rundown hand does not look so clever on a paired low board. For success in Omaha 8, you must evaluate whether a flop is good or bad, and escape from the bad ones quickly.

This is an extract from Omaha 8 or Better: Winning at Hi Low Poker by Andy Mack

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Andy 'IggyPop77' Mack

About Andy 'IggyPop77' Mack

Andy's first love was chess. Three times a competitor in the British Championships, he has played regularly at international level, achieving the rank of FIDE Master. On a fateful day in 2007 Andy visited Las Vegas for the first time. Since that point, his attention has switched from chess to poker. Initially focusing on Hold'em, Andy has branched out, and has been working hard over the past couple of years to perfect his Omaha 8 game. He also plays all the other variants of the 8 Game. Away from poker, Andy's hero is rock star Iggy Pop. Andy claims to love Iggy's wild man image, although even his best friends would find it hard to compare Andy's solid poker style with that of the Godfather of Punk.